typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
It's the fourth Friday in September. The last Friday that I will be my current age. September, that blesséd month, which brings us extraordinary babies.

I'm not sure whether we haven't quite recovered from last week's illnesses, or if all the rain has made plants go extra crazy with the pollen and just making my hay fever worse, but we have both been a bit out of it all week.

Anyway, here are the links I gathered this week, sorted into categories as accurately as I could.

Links of the Week



Jimmy Kimmel vs. Graham-Cassidy, Lying Liars, and the "Death to America" Crowd (That Would Be Today's GOP. And Yesterday's GOP. And Tomorrow's GOP.).

MY YEAR INSIDE THE INTERNATIONAL ALT-RIGHT.

This Teenager Saved Numerous People During Hurricane Harvey Using An Air Mattress.

The Week in Bisexual Awareness



7 Ridiculous Things NOT to Say to Bisexual Folks.

Science!



Celebrating and Mourning Cassini in Its Finale at Saturn.

Cassini’s own discoveries were its demise.

Glowing Red Eye: Cosmic Bubble Surrounds Odd 'Carbon Star'.

Archaeologists Discover Something Truly Bizarre in an Isolated Medieval Graveyard.

Hubble discovers a unique type of object in the Solar System.

Glowing slinky-like 'creature' is actually a mass of eggs.

This Extinct Frog Probably Ate Crocodiles and Dinosaurs.

Narcissistic Parents Are Literally Incapable Of Loving Their Children.

Octlantis is a just-discovered underwater city engineered by octopuses .

This Week in Natural Disaster



Mexico Earthquake: More Than 200 Dead as Buildings Collapse.

Nancy Reagan Visited Mexico After the Earthquake of 1985, and She Brought a Check.

Puerto Rico entirely without power as Hurricane Maria hammers island with force not seen in ‘modern history’.

Death toll climbs as volunteers join search for Mexico earthquake survivors.

Maria kills 15 in Dominica, leaves Puerto Rico dark for months.

Hurricane Maria leaves Puerto Rico powerless, at least 15 dead on Dominica.

This week in awful news



Male entitlement in action: Why the Texas shooting is a gender issue: Our culture still teaches men that women owe them affection — and that can have deadly consequences.

This week in awful people



White Campus Security Guard Shoots Himself, Then Blames Black Man Who Doesn’t Exist to Cover It Up.

News for queers and our allies:



Students Stage Mass Protest After High School Fails to Punish Transphobic Football Players.

This week in Writing



A Writing Punch List Can Keep You Focused as You Edit Your Manuscript.

This Week in Tech



World Wide Web Consortium abandons consensus, standardizes DRM with 58.4% support, EFF resigns.

YouTube has “no idea” why queer gaming videos are being barred from monetisation.

Culture war news:



Episode of an Animated Children's Show Gets Pulled From Netflix For Dick Drawing.

This week in the Resistance:



Pepe the Frog’s Creator Goes Legally Nuclear Against the Alt-Right.

This Week Regarding the Lying Liar:



Angry Right-Wingers Turn On Trump, Burn Their ‘Make America Great Again’ Hats.

Still no charity money from leftover Trump inaugural funds.

Holy Bullies and Headless Monsters: Trump wants crude anti-LGBTQ activist as pick for federal judge.

News about the Fascist Regime:



Border Patrol Arrests Near Safe Zones Worry Immigrant Advocates.

This week in Politics:



Republican Leaders Defy Bipartisan Opposition to Health Law Repeal.

Republicans' new repeal bill would probably leave millions more uninsured, new analyses suggest.

Democrats' Unsolvable Media Problem.

This Week in Racists, White Nationalists, and other deplorables:



Undercover With the Alt-Right.

‘It’s gonna end with concentration camps’: Alt-right executive boasts of a future Europe with Hitler on their money.

Milo Yiannopoulos’ “censored” Berkeley event smells like a massive troll .

KUOW Interviewed That Nazi Who Got Punched and People Hate It.

This Week in Foreign Enemies



Facebook’s Heading Toward a Bruising Run-In With the Russia Probe.

Facebook Enabled Advertisers to Reach ‘Jew Haters’: After being contacted by ProPublica, Facebook removed several anti-Semitic ad categories and promised to improve monitoring.

Facebook to Share 3,000+ Russian-linked Ads with Congress.

Farewells:



The Tao of Harry Dean Stanton: Alcohol, Cigarettes, and Knowing “You’re Nothing”.

Harry Dean Stanton, ‘Big Love,’ ‘Twin Peaks’ Star, Dies at 91.

Bernie Casey (1939 – 2017), artist, actor, and athlete.

Boxing Legend Jake LaMotta, Real-Life ‘Raging Bull,’ Dead At 95.

Things I wrote:



Weekend Update 9/17/2017: Juggalos, Hillary book signing both outnumber Trump “mother of all rallies”.

A writer writes!

Angry men on buses — not all violence is equal.

Don’t try to obscure hate and violence with your false equivalence.

Defining one’s self vs being defined — adventures in dictionaries.

Videos!



Wonder Woman - Etta Candy Reminisces About Diana:



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)

White Wedding (metal cover by Leo Moracchioli):



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)

Toto - Africa (metal cover by Leo Moracchioli feat. Rabea & Hannah):



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)

Sam Smith - Too Good At Goodbyes (Official Video):



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
It is Bisexual Visibility Week, but this post shouldn’t be about me. Because I’m not bisexual. But I happen to be married to a bisexual man and our social circle includes a lot of bisexual people. Bi-erasure is a real thing that I am at least adjacent to (and sometimes find myself really irritated about). But it is also something which I am guilty of contributing to...

(The rest of the Bi Visibility Week post is at FontFolly.Net.)
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
Since I wrote about the Nazi getting punched yesterday, I thought I was through, but a lot of people have been sharing a tweet that says, “I want to live in a world where people wearing Nazi symbols and people wearing rainbows can do so without being attacked.” And oh, I have so many responses to this. The first is that this is the mother of all false equivalents. When queer people and their allies where rainbows, they are saying “everyone deserves to live free of unfair discrimination no matter their sexual orientation and gender identity.” That is it. When a person wears a swastika...

(The rest of this post is at FontFolly.Net.)

(no subject)

Sep. 21st, 2017 01:16 am
aurifer: (Default)
[personal profile] aurifer
I've been keeping up with my journals from five years ago, but I've realized I'm going through a lot of memories about 2007, which was ten years ago. It was only suitable, then, that I should dig through my archives for a copy of my 2007 posts. Wow, my writing style has changed. If you'd call that a style, I mean. I don't know if I was just sort of half-referencing things, or if it was a function of having three or four different groups of friends. I think I'm generally freer about things now, though I still just don't mention things that I don't want to take time to explain.

I'm probably also a lot better at codifying my thoughts into a more-universal communication! Maybe in ten years I'll wonder why the heck I wrote that sentence the way I did.

Anyway, I probably won't keep up with it the way I've been keeping up with my five-year-old journals. Lots of fluff and minutiae, and I could tell it's not where I 'was' like with the more recent stuff. That stuff, meanwhile, is kind of where I was supposed to be before time passed me by. Reading it is, in part, an effort to reclaim the crumbs that fell from my memory throughout the journey.
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
Several years ago I witnessed an altercation on the bus. When I first got on, I noticed one guy with blond hair that was combed just so and his mustache was freshly trimmed, and he was dressed in what looked like a new suit and tie. He was sitting up super-straight, as if he had an iron rod up his backside. Everything about him radiated attitude. His smile was particularly smug.

I had already seen that one of my favorite seats near the back was open, so I headed back there and turned my attention back to the news radio I was listening to on my headphones...

(The rest of this post relating a personal anecdote from some time back to a news incident this week is at FontFolly.Net.)

A writer writes!

Sep. 19th, 2017 09:18 am
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
In the old days, when reading usually meant you were holding a physical book or magazine or manuscript in your hand, if something you read so infuriated you or was simply awfully written, you could literally throw it against the wall (or into the trashcan) in disgust. On Sunday this last weekend I really, really wanted to do that after reading a particular blog post. I’m not going to link to it or identify the author, because that would just be harassment—even though the author of the blog post is a professional who uses their blog to give advice and has (self) published books offering advice on writing. Instead, I need to follow the advice I give all the time: if you want more good things in the world for people to read, don’t complain about what’s out there, make something yourself.

Over the years I’ve had many conversations with aspiring writers...

(The rest of this post about writing and gatekeeping is at: FontFolly.Net.)

Finder's Keeper, by Shira Anthony

Sep. 18th, 2017 02:58 pm
duncandahusky: (Default)
[personal profile] duncandahusky

When Zane moves into an old gothic brownstone, he discovers the house comes equipped with a caretaker-Kit, who lives in the basement. Zane is immediately drawn to the charming and attractive Kit. But Kit is much more than he seems. He is a two-hundred-year-old half-human, half-red-fox spirit who guards a Gate between the mortal and spirit worlds-a fact Zane should recognize, but doesn’t.


Orphaned at a young age, Zane never learned he comes from a long line of mystical Keepers. Kit needs Zane’s help to protect the Gate, but how can he tell Zane of his legacy when that will crush Zane’s dreams of traveling the world? If he takes up the mantle, Zane will be bound to the Gate, unable to leave it. But when Zane realizes Kit’s true nature, and his own, he’ll have to make a choice-fight to protect Kit and the Gate, or deny his destiny and any chance of a future with Kit.


Finder’s Keeper, by Shira Anthony (Heart’s Gate #1)


Rating: 4.5 out of 5


BRB, swooning.


Kit is so freakin’ adorable! He is caring and kind, and quite the hottie as well. Zane is a keeper (heh) too – smart, funny, and humble. I adored these two together, and the sense of wonder from Zane was thoroughly charming. His thoughtfulness toward Kit made me smile, and Kit’s awkwardness in accepting this new-to-him consideration is both heartbreaking and heartwarming.


The author does a fantastic job of bringing in some wonderful plot elements that I haven’t often seen in paranormal romances. Her descriptions of the nature of the spirit world and its effect on the human world really made this book something special. The guardian/keeper dynamic is an interesting one as well, and fun to explore.


I do have a few minor complaints, especially some plot developments late in the book that don’t have time to be fully explored or explained enough for my liking. Also, there are a few errors in the editing where the terms “Guardian” and “Keeper” are swapped that made things confusing until I figured out what was intended. These characters are so great I’m happy to overlook these things, though.


This is a great book that brings some welcome novelty to the genre. I recommend it highly.

Out of the Ashes, by Ari McKay

Sep. 18th, 2017 02:54 pm
duncandahusky: (Default)
[personal profile] duncandahusky


Alpha werewolf Eli Hammond returns from a fishing trip to discover a nasty surprise-five members of his pack murdered and the rest missing. He needs help locating and rescuing his pack mates, but the supernatural council in Asheville, North Carolina, turns him away.


Except for one man.


As they work together, Eli is stunned-and not especially thrilled-to discover half-elf Arden Gilmarin is his destined mate. But as Arden and his friends struggle to help Eli in his quest, Eli surrenders to the demands of his body-and his heart. They’ll need to bond together, because the forces opposing them are stronger and more sinister than anyone predicted. The evil has its sights set on Arden, and if Eli wants to save his mate and the people he is entrusted with protecting, he’s in for the fight of his life.


Out of the Ashes, by Ari McKay (Asheville Arcana #1)


Rating: 4 out of 5


Paranormal elements aside, this is your basic good ol’ boy meets sophisticated citified guy. The typical werewolf trope of “fated mates” brings them together but what can I say? I’m a sucker for that (also, the Dreamspun Beyond line is designed to be somewhat trope-tastic, so it’s to be expected). Also, I totally want Arden’s house, but that’s beside the point.


The narrative point of view switches back and forth between Eli and Arden so we get a good feel for both characters. Both are caring, hardworking men and they make a great couple. The side characters are great as well; Arden’s friends-with-benefits Whimsy (a wizard) and Julian (a vampire) play a big role. I am guessing they will be the protagonists for the next two books.


The plot keeps the suspense up, although there a few “What the heck are you doing?” moments and at times the pacing seemed a bit off. There’s also a couple of unanswered questions, though perhaps they are threads to be addressed in future stories. The story is engaging enough that I enjoyed it, though.


Finally: I grew up in Upstate South Carolina so Asheville, North Carolina and Clayton, Georgia are part of my old stomping grounds. I admit that I went into this with a critical eye, but McKay did a nice job of getting a feel for the area, with an appropriate number of references to local landmarks. I could even imagine exactly where some of the fictional places in the book could be located.


I’d recommend this one, and can’t wait to see more in the series!

Weird, work-related dreams

Sep. 15th, 2017 10:09 am
plonq: (Usual Silly Mood)
[personal profile] plonq
I had a weird, work-related dream last night.

At the start of the dream I wasn't actually working, rather I was just out with my younger brother and we happened to be down by the tracks watching them move cars. In this case, the cars were being moved by somebody who was obviously a contractor, because rather than a locomotive, he was driving a Semi that had been modified to run on rails. He was tied onto about a dozen cars, and was trying to back them around a fairly tight bend into what I assumed was a storage siding. The guy was having trouble getting the cars to move, and finally he floored it and they started to move. I remembered part of my training about the dangers of applying too much throttle when pushing around a corner, and even as I thought that, one of the cars in the middle of the cut jumped the rail with its trailing set of trucks and began bouncing along the ties.

I hopped of the car and ran toward the guy, frantically waving a stop signal at him with both arms. He stared at me for quite awhile, pushing this derailed car up the rails before he finally stopped. When he stopped, the slack ran out and the car hopped back onto the rails. Naturally he did not believe me about the derailment, even when I pointed to the trail of broken ties. He yelled at me about how I was killing his productivity, hopped back into his truck, and floored it again.

This time he managed to jackknife and derail the whole track; cars went everywhere.

He was livid. He started screaming at me about how this was all my fault for putting him behind, and how he was going to kill me and my brother. By this time I was back in the car (because he had at least cleared the crossing) and we both agreed that we should probably report this incident - not the least reason being that he was threatening our lives.

The dream transitioned to the office, where I was looking for somebody who might care about a contractor who had derailed a dozen cars and threatened to kill an employee and his family member. The office was mysteriously empty, but I finally managed to track everybody down in one of the large meeting rooms. One of our project leads was out from the head office, giving a talk about swearing in the workplace. The focus of the talk was not what I'd have expected though, focusing on how swearing has been shown to be good stress-reliever, and is a valuable tool when employed respectfully. She illustrated a respectful use of swearing.

"Our new director is a cunt."

Everybody applauded - well, in fairness I did not. I was a bit appalled, thinking, "That's not really very respectful at all, even if she used a fake Aussie accent when saying it. Our new director is actually very nice."

It was about this time that I began to suspect that it was a dream, and I woke shortly after.
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
It's Friday, the third Friday in September. I should be more happy about that than I am.

This week, my husband came down sick early in the week, and I have followed. So it hasn't been a fabulous week for us. And you may notice that this week's collection of links is a bit shorter, as once again I haven't had as much time to read the news.

Anyway, here are the links I gathered this week, sorted into categories as accurately as I could.

Links of the Week



I downloaded an app. And suddenly, was part of the Cajun Navy.

One of the most common questions in American small talk is seen as rude in much of the world.

Study: Atheists behave more fairly toward Christians than Christians behave toward atheists.

Science!



Uranus is a 'nightmare' with a lopsided, tumbling magnetic shield that opens and closes every day like a light switch.

The Sun’s Energy Doesn’t Come From Fusing Hydrogen Into Helium (Mostly).

Climate-change deniers are the new Marlboro Men.

What We Know about the Climate Change–Hurricane Connection: Some links are indisputable; others are more subtle, but the science is improving all the time.

Is climate change wreaking weather havoc? Evolving science seeks answers.

Why Extreme Deadly Hurricanes, Heat Waves and Wildfires Are Here to Stay.

The weather report is climate science, too.

Science Fiction, Fantasy and Speculation!



Inspiration via meme.

Harrison Ford on ‘Star Wars’, ‘Blade Runner’, and Punching Ryan Gosling in the Face.

This Week in the Economy



Amazon Is Not Your Newly Cheating Lover, Seattle. It's a Massive Business With a Low-Tax Agenda.

This Week in Difficult to Classify



Freelancers Sue Historic Black Magazine for $70,000 in Unpaid Invoices.

Bloodstained ice axe used to kill Trotsky emerges after decades in the shadows.

This week in awful news



Multiple victims in shooting at Freeman High School; one student dead; suspect detained.

This week in awful people who only have themselves to blame



The 'Handbook For Mortals' Saga Continues As Lani Sarem Goes On The No Apologies Tour.

Liberal Celebrities Who Helped Elect Trump, Kindly STFU About DACA - You already proved that your ideology matters more than our safety.

News for queers and our allies:



Six Actors We Lost Prematurely To AIDS Who Are Worth Remembering.

This week in Writing



Let Me Tell You.

This Week in Tech



Study finds Reddit’s controversial ban of its most toxic subreddits actually worked.

An old link, but worth repeating: Internet Trolls Are Narcissists, Psychopaths, and Sadists.

Where Do We Go from Here?



Guest Editorial: Enough About 9/11, Already.

This Week in Inclusion



I Was Made to Believe There’s Something Wrong With Me: Why #BlackLivesMatter in YA Lit.

This Week in Police Problems



The Detective Who Pulled a Gun on a Motorcyclist Had a History of Road Rage Complaints.

This Week Regarding the Lying Liar:



“Oh hi Ivanka”: Finally, we know the least essential White House employee’s real role.

What it took for Republicans finally to feel betrayed by Trump.

This week in Politics:



Mayor Ed Murray Resigns After Fifth Man Accuses Him of Child Sex Abuse.

What You Need to Know About the Seattle Mayoral Succession.

“Prophetess” Opal Covey Comes in Last Place in Toledo Mayoral Race (Again).

This Week in Racists, White Nationalists, and other deplorables:



Good Christian Boys: Jesus Worse Than Hitler.“We executed Nazis after World War 2 for engaging in collective punishment and ordering reprisal killings—rounding up and shooting innocent villagers after resistance fighters staged attacks. Kevin would have us believe that Jesus—the Prince of Peace, the Friend of the Poor, the Lamb of God, etc.—will happily drown little old straight ladies in nursing homes because He’s angry at gay men cavorting in bars on the other side of town.”

Study: A Picture of a Black Person Can Anger Trump Supporters and Change Their Politics.

Vox Day thinks lying is great “persuasion.” Unless people are lying about him..

This Week in Foreign Enemies



Pro-Russian Bots Sharpen Online Attacks for 2018 U.S. Vote.

North Korea fires second ballistic missile over Japan.

China is getting tougher on North Korea—to stop the US from getting tougher on it.

This Week in Sexism



Amber Tamblyn Pens Open Letter to James Woods.

Emma, J.Law, and Scarlett’s Older-Man Problem.

Farewells:



Edith Windsor, Lesbian Trailblazer Who Changed Your Life, Has Died.

Edith Windsor, gay rights pioneer, dies at 88.

Postscript: Edith Windsor, 1929-2017.

How Edith Windsor Became a 'Matriarch of the Gay-Rights Movement'.

Jerry Pournellle (1933-2017).

Things I wrote:



Sunday Funnies, part 25.

Confessions of a writing tool addict—good intentions paving the way.

Worry about you and other revelations for a Wednesday.

How people use a word can tell you more about them than they wish — more adventures in dictionaries.

Videos!



Alfie Arcuri - If They Only Knew:



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)

Propellerheads feat: Miss Shirley Bassey - History Repeating:



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)

The Hound - Can't Let You Go (Official Video):



(If embedding doesn't work, click here.)
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
I can’t count the number of times, as a child, that some adult (relatives, teachers, or people from church) would take me aside to suggest or insist that if I would just be more obedient or behave the way my dad expected, he wouldn’t have to be so strict with me. I know my younger siblings got similar admonishments: Dad wouldn’t be forced to use such strict punishments on us if only we could placate his moods. They never referred to his behavior as “abuse,” it was always said that he was “strict” and that he “had a temper.” And while they often implied that they thought his punishment was harsher than necessary, they never acknowledged that his behavior had crossed a line into being unacceptable or uncalled for. Which is quite amazing if I explain some of the specifics.

Content Warning: the following essay (which will also touch on dangerous misperceptions and myths about sexual orientation) includes some specifics about physical abuse of children and worse. Only click when you’re ready …

(The rest of this post about meanings, definitions, perceptions, and more is at FontFolly.Net.
typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
Apple announced more than one new phone yesterday, and like most years, a certain percentage of current iPhone owners are debating which one to upgrade to as our older iPhones are now more than two years old. More than one person I know is still hanging onto the same iPhone they’ve owned for three years and not sure that they will upgrade this year or wait a bit. But Apple haters all act as if all of us blindly rush out to buy the newest one every year. We don’t, but hey, if your life is so hollow that you need to make fun of other people’s choices of what goods and services to use, I guess that’s what you have to do.

But the really funny thing for me is how many of the haters are making fun of the cost of the high end Apply phone (not the shiny new iPhone 8 that the vast majority of us will buy, but the premium model that literally most of us can’t—not just because of the price, but because of manufacturing limits, but I’ll come back to that) are also comparing it to a particular Samsung Galaxy, about which others were asking just last month: Why does Samsung think you’d be willing to spend nearly $1,000 on a Galaxy Note 8?. Seriously, you can’t complain about price by comparing it to a phone that is just as expensive...

(The rest of this post about technology, posting, and other things is at FontFolly.Net.)
duncandahusky: (Default)
[personal profile] duncandahusky



A buffalo walks into a cafe. Sounds like the start of a bad joke, but for coyote shifter Donnie Granger, it’s the beginning of an obsession. Donnie is a little hyperactive and a lot distractible, except when it comes to William. He finally works up the nerve to approach William but is interrupted by a couple of violent humans.


While William—don’t call me Bill—is currently a professor, he once worked undercover against an international weapons-trafficking ring. Before he can settle into obscurity, he must find out who leaked his location and eliminate the thugs. He tries keeping his distance to protect Donnie, but the wily coyote won’t stay away.


It’ll take both Donnie’s skills as a stalker—er, hunter—and William’s super-spy expertise to neutralize the threat so they can discover if an excitable coyote and a placid-until-pissed buffalo have a future together.


Stalking Buffalo Bill, by j. leigh bailey


Rating: 4.25 out of 5


This was the first book from Dreamspinner Press’ “Dreamspun Beyond” line that I’ve read. This line promises paranormal romances with relatively low angst, with a focus more on the characters’ emotions and sensual tension. In short, this is pretty much targeted directly to me!


This is such a fun story! The setting alone, a shifter-friendly university in Cody, Wyoming in a world where humans are unaware shifters exist, creates all kinds of possibilities. This is kind of obvious given that the book is labeled “Shifter U. #1” and I look forward to seeing more.


Donnie is such a lovable goofball. He’s smart, funny, and impulsive – every bit the coyote. He’s a perfect foil for William, a stoic and taciturn professorial-type. The sparks between the two of them are so fun to read as they waver between “I can’t keep away from you!” and “You annoy the crap out of me!” I really enjoyed seeing the relationship evolve between the two. I think it’s a great endorsement that I was invested enough in Donnie and William that I was in tears as they reached their Happily Ever After (Spoiler? Not likely!). They really are a sweet couple. The side characters are quite entertaining too, even if most of them have little time on the page. Donnie’s best friend Ford stands out, not only as a smart and pragmatic guy, but also an intriguing type of shifter. I would guess we’ll be seeing more of Ford in the next book in this series.


The one place where the plot breaks down a bit is the international espionage element. It just seemed a little over the top. It’s well-written and keeps things moving along well enough that it’s a minor annoyance, though.


I’ll give this one 4.25 out of 5. I eagerly await the next book in the series!

typographer: Me on a car in the middle of nowhere, eastern Colorado, age four (Default)
[personal profile] typographer
’ve written a few times about some of the issues I face being a packrat who comes from a long line of packrats. One of the manifestations of the behavior is that I collect things, but not all of the things I collect are the sorts of things most people think of as collectable: keyboards, headphones, iPods, dictionaries, typewriters… and word processing programs....

(The rest of this post about the eccentricities of this writer are at FontFolly.Net.)

Ergonomics

Sep. 11th, 2017 10:09 am
plonq: (Somewhat Pleased Mood)
[personal profile] plonq
We bought a new microwave oven on the weekend to replace the one that died on Friday. On my list of exciting things to do, buying a microwave oven rates pretty low down the list. A microwave oven is not one of those fun appliances that you stand around and try different things with. Not any more. We all know what happens when you put an egg, grape, puppy (etc) in the microwave oven; it does not end well.

The old one was getting on 30 years old, but it was actually pretty fancy for its time. Many of the ones available at the time still had dials, but mine had push buttons, and pre-sets, and even a meat probe that I never got around to using. It also had a couple of clever ergonomic touches that I have always thought should be standard in every microwave oven.

We did a bit of research before both of us decided that a microwave oven does not require the same level of careful selection as a camera, or a car, or something else that is actually fun to buy. We drove up to Canadian Tire and picked up a free one using our accumulated points there. Our two main criteria was that it should be at least 1000 watts, and large enough to be useful, but small enough to fit the existing microwave stand. It's effectively the same brand as our old one (Panasonic versus Sanyo), so I hoped that some of the features of the old one would carry over.

My favourite feature did not.

The turntable in our old microwave oven always stopped in the same position as it started. If I put a cup of coffee in the oven and hit any amount of time, when I opened the door at the end, the turntable would have completed its rotation so that the handle was facing exactly where I had left it. This new oven behaves like all of the ones in our office (they have 3 different brands strewn about in the break room). When the cooking stops, the turntable stops.

I am left wondering if this was some patented action that Sanyo licensed very briefly and then stopped using it, or if I just happened to buy an oven that was designed by forward-thinking engineers who said, "This would be a really nice little ergonomic touch..." It was just one of those nice little things that one takes for granted until it is gone.

--- The original of this is posted at https://plonq.dreamwidth.org/

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